MOTORSPORT AS PASSION.

BMW M GmbH.

PERFECTION AS A DRIVING FORCE.

BMW M GmbH.

PERFORMANCE AS A CONCEPT.

BMW M GmbH.

EXCLUSIVITY AS STANDARD.

BMW M GmbH.

MOTORSPORT AS PASSION.

BMW M GmbH.

PERFECTION AS A DRIVING FORCE.

BMW M GmbH.

PERFORMANCE AS A CONCEPT.

BMW M GmbH.

EXCLUSIVITY AS STANDARD.

BMW M GmbH.

Born on the racetrack, eyes focused on the road, and pumped with lots of adrenalin: the M is by no means an ordinary letter, in fact the most powerful in the world. The fascination for BMW has lived for more than four decades, carried on and renewed by people who transfer their keenly felt passion for motorsport into every single part of this exceptional automobile. With a special philosophy and the drive to redefine limits, not just powerful engines are created – but legends of the road.

“BMW M stands for a philosophy, not dogmatically for a technology. Our products stand for precision and agility and thus have their own special M specific identity."

“BMW M stands for a philosophy, not dogmatically for a technology. Our products stand for precision and agility and thus have their own special M specific identity."

Frank van Meel, President BMW M Division

Our first aim was to make the car much lighter. When we had achieved that, we concentrated on the aerodynamics and increased the displacement. From then on, we were unbeatable.
Jochen Neerpasch, Co-founder of BMW M GmbH, about the BMW 3.0 CSL

M DRIVING PLEASURE FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS.

The success story of the BMW M3.

An immediate winner.

The first BMW M3 came on the market in the summer of 1986. The 4-cylinder suction engine performed 143 kW / 195 hp, sprinted from 0 to 100 km /h in 6.8 seconds and reached a top speed of 230 km /h. Including the convertible version, as well as other special models, BMW sold 17,970 worldwide. In 1987, the E30 wrote auto racing history when Robert Ravaglia won the first World Touring Car Championship. To this day, the BMW M3 is the most successful touring car in the world.

A wolf in sheep’s clothing.

The E36, which debuted in 1992, had a 6-cylinder engine with 3.0 litres capacity and 210 kW / 286 hp and managed a sprint from 0 to 100 km /h in less than six seconds. The top speed was electronically limited at 250 km/h. In 1995, the capacity was increased to 3.2 litres, the output increased to 236 kw /321 hp. As the world first large-series vehicle, the BMW M3, starting in 1997, was also available with an optional Sequential M transmission (SMG). It came off the belt 71,242 times.

With lots of power into the new century.

In 2000, the Powerdome on the engine bonnet added another, and now traditional, identifying mark of the BMW M3. From the 3.2 litres 6-cylinder in-line engine, the sports star drew 252 kW /343 hp. From zero to 100 km / h only 5.2 seconds was needed. For the first time, the BMW M3 also had a variable differential lock on the rear axle. The sporty top version of this series was the BMW M3 CSL, introduced in 2003.

Real Collectors’ Items.

From 2007, the fourth BMW M3 generation has an 8-cylinder engine which drew 309 kW /420 hp from 3,999 cubic centimetres. The engine bonnet with the striking Powerdome was made of aluminium as well as large parts of the newly-developed lightweight chassis. Among the highlights of the fourth generation was the production of the exclusive BMW M3 small series, including the 135 BMW M3 GTS with 450 hp or the almost 67 units of the BMW M3 CRT (Carbon Racing Technology).

Lightweight construction perfected.

For many components in the fifth generation of the BMW M3, ultra-light materials like carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) or aluminium were used. The perfect lightweight construction concept creates, together with an extremely low-lying point of gravity, the basis for excellent driving handling: more agility and dynamics as well as optimised accelerating and braking. The intelligent material mix of carbon-fibre and aluminium ensures an exceptionally low car weight, and the performance of the M TwinPower Turbo engine with 331 kW (450hp) speaks for itself.

286 HP

was the performance of the first BMW M5 (1985) and surpassed nearly three-fold the performance of the series counterpart.

BUSINESS CLASS SPORTS CARS.

The BMW M5 Generations.

A new concept.

This series model was designed to offer the experience of racetrack technology for everyday use. With a maximum speed of 245 km/h, the first BMW M5 was the fastest sedan of its time and was unique in all respects. BMW Motorsport GmbH had created an entirely new class of vehicle: the high-performance sedan. In just three years, 2,200 hand-finished BMW M5’s were sold.

More powerful, more individual.

Subtle modifications to the suspension design and unique light-alloy wheels gave the second generation BMW M5 an individual yet understated look. The capacity was increased to 3.6 litres and in 1992 to 3.8 litres. This enabled the in-line 6-cylinder petrol engine to increase its output to 232 kW/315 hp or 250 kW/341 hp. Optional Nürburgring performance suspension was also available. More than 12,000 vehicles were sold.

The first 8-cylinder engine.

The third generation BMW M5 was more athletic than ever. It was characterised by powerful front and rear aprons, distinctive side skirts, aerodynamically shaped M wing mirrors, 18 inch M light-alloy wheels and four tailpipes. With its 5 litre, 8-cylinder engine and an output of 294 kW/400 hp, the third generation BMW M5 took only 5.3 seconds to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h. It too was a commercial success setting new records: over 20,000 vehicles were sold worldwide.

High-tech from motorsport.

The fourth generation BMW M5 had outstanding performance characteristics: a V10 high-rev engine with an output of 373 kW/507 hp, directly inspired by Formula One, sequential M transmission with seven gears, Drivelogic and Launch Control, a variable M differential lock and athletic suspension technology. Its thrust enabled acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in 4.7 seconds. The V10 engine won the overall ranking for the ‘Engine of the Year Award’ two years running. About 19,500 vehicles were sold.

A passion for maximum performance.

The fifth generation BMW M5 evoked a passion for maximum performance. It had the typical attributes of a BMW M car: a sense of harmony, the latest technology and outstanding dynamic driving characteristics. Under the engine bonnet, a high-rev V8 engine with M TwinPower Turbo technology enabled a peak performance of 412 kW/560 hp. The spontaneous power delivery and a maintained level of thrust – so characteristic of M – enabled acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in 4.3 seconds.
My dad had a black BMW M3 and I always begged him to take me for a ride and speed up. Even now, it gives me a thrill each time I get in the car and start the motor. You can sense the passion that goes into building each and every model.
Bruno Spengler, race driver DTM
It’s at least 1,300 hp, probably more powerful, but I can’t say exactly because that’s the limit of our testing facility.
Paul Rosche, BMW engineer, about his 1,400 hp engine – the most powerful Formula One engine of all time.

CREATIVE LATERAL THINKING.

CREATIVE LATERAL THINKING.

BMW M innovations.

The freedom to come up with new ideas has lead to groundbreaking technological highlights for BMW M and many other BMW models. For instance, the M dual-clutch transmission with Drivelogic in the BMW M3 and BMW M4. The water injection system in the BMW M4 GTS. Or the cylinder bank-overlapping exhaust manifold for the BMW M5 and BMW M6. Time and again, the BMW M redefines the limits.

These race cars are like life, they are powerful and there is a lot of energy. You can participate with it, add to it and let yourself transcend with its energy.
Artist Jeff Koons about his Art Car, the BMW M3 GT2

THE ART OF MOTORSPORT.

THE ART OF MOTORSPORT.

The BMW M3 GT2 Art Car by Jeff Koons.

Since 1975, BMW has collaborated with a number of artists on the exterior design of powerful cars to create unique works of art on wheels. The 17th car in the BMW Art Car Collection was designed by Jeff Koons and unmistakably symbolises the explosive energy of motorsport.

Further information about the official fuel consumption and the official specific CO2 emissions for new passenger automobiles can be found in the 'New Passenger Vehicle Fuel Consumption and CO2 Emission Guidelines', which are available free of charge at all sales outlets, from Deutsche Automobil Treuhand GmbH (DAT), Hellmuth-Hirth-Str. 1, 73760 Ostfildern, Germany, or under http://www.dat.de/en/offers/publications/guideline-for-fuel-consumption.html. The figures are not based on an individual vehicle and do not constitute part of the product offer; they are provided solely for the purposes of comparison between different vehicle types. CO2 emissions caused by the production and provision of fuel or other energy sources are not taken into account in the determination of CO2 emissions pursuant to Directive 1999/94/EC.